The Texas Chrysotype Revolution
The Process
The Process
The Manual
The Manual
The Prints
The Prints
The Videos
The Videos
The Artist
The Artist
Links

The Texas Revolution in Gold, the Texas Chrysotype, is a new formula for printing photographic images in gold. It differs from other chrysotype processes in that: Preparing the solution for a Texas Chrysotype involves adding from 3 to 8 drops of 1% ascorbic acid solution (Vitamin C) to 10 ml of 40% ammonium ferric oxalate. The result is a light-sensitive chemical composed of ammonium ferric-ferrous oxalate, which replaces the old plain ammonium ferric oxalate for printing out gold (as well as platinum and palladium). Fewer drops convert less of the ferric iron to ferrous iron and thereby reduce contrast, smooth tonal transitions, and minimize grain; more drops convert more of the iron to its ferrous state and increase grain and contrast. The printing process is as simple as coat paper with gold and ammonium ferric-ferrous oxalate, dry the sensitized paper thoroughly, contact print by direct examination, and clear the iron from the paper.

The Karytype is the first new iron-based printing process in exactly 100 years, since Willis patented the Satista print. With the Karytype, you do not add gold to platinum to introduce violet undertones to the image; rather you mix gold and platinum in varying proportions (generally greater than 50% gold) to print out a gray-scale image that exhibits the synergy of the two metals interacting with each other. A Karytype exhibits the strong Dmax of gold (the Texas Chrysotype is very different from the 19th century based Chrysotype S), and gold's luminous glow in areas of strong microcontrast complements the wide tonal range of platinum and its delicate highlight gradation. I printed my first Karytype in the quest to find the correct combination of the noble metals (since no one of them alone sufficed) to reproduce the loveliness of a series of negatives I had exposed of my beautiful model, Kary. With gold-platinum, her personality and luminescent presence, the expressive intensity of life force she exudes, appeared for the first time ever in any photographic print I had seen of her.

The model Kary after whom the Karytype is named.